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Language Access, Interpretation, and Translation

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In the U.S. in 2011, 21% of those over 5 spoke a language other than English at home. Of those, 41.8% (25,321,194) spoke English less than “very well.”

U.S. Census American Community Survey data on Language Use, 2011

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964  ensures language access for individuals with limited English proficiency. Victims of domestic and sexual violence primarily receive services through programs funded by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Justice (DOJ). Programs receiving federal funds – directly or indirectly, through grants, contracts or subcontracts; dispersed by federal, state, county, or city authorities – are required to develop and implement policies that ensure meaningful access for limited English proficient persons.

Interpretation Technical Assistance & Resource Center (ITARC)

The Interpretation Technical Assistance & Resource Center (ITARC) works to improve systems responses to LEP victims by providing technical assistance and training on the development and implementation of language accessible services. Technical assistance and training includes, but is not limited to: civil rights compliance and language access planning; interpreting for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault ; and building pools of qualified interpreters through workshops on interpretation ethics and skills building.

Request Technical Assistance or Training on Language Access

ITARC offers training and technical assistance to advocates, interpreters, and social and legal service providers. Use this form to submit a request.

Potential topics include:

  • Federal and state laws and policies on language access in civil and criminal courts,
  • Meeting the needs of culturally diverse victims/survivors with limited English proficiency,
  • Improving language access policies and practices in organizations and systems,
  • Roles and responsibilities of advocates and systems personnel at various points of contact,
  • Model programs and practices for interpretation services,
  • Training and qualifying standards for court interpretation, and
  • Finding and working with interpreters.

Submit a request:

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Resources on Language Access

Other Resources

LEP.gov: Information, tools, and technical assistance regarding language access for federal agencies, federal fund recipients, and stakeholders.

Hot Peach Pages: Domestic violence resources in over 110 languages

American Bar Association language access resources

Please see our Language Access Resource Guide for additional resources