News and Events

How do Recent ‘Public Charge’ Policy Changes Impact Immigrant Survivors of Crime?

In September 2022, The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued a final rule interpreting the meaning and application of the “public charge” provisions of immigration law. This advisory describes provisions under the new final rule and how it will impact immigrant survivors of violence, particularly in light of the pandemic.

Related Resources

By Grace Huang, J.D.

October 2022

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Bridges: A Connect Call for Asians, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders Addressing Gender-Based Violence

Bridges: A Connect Call for Asians, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders Addressing Gender-Based Violence

Next call: October 25, 2022 (9am HST / 12pm PST / 3pm CST / 3pm EST)

These bi-monthly community connect calls are intended to be a space for AANHPI advocates, community members, and allies to connect, dialogue, share successes, problem solve, and network. API-GBV staff will be available to moderate and encourage discussion, but this is a space for YOU, as the experts of this work, to share your experiences and to learn from allies across the country.

October’s theme: Navigating the Grants Process

With several current federal grants opening soon, is your organization well positioned to take advantage of the upcoming opportunities? October’s Bridges Connect Call will be a space to discuss the opportunities and challenges around grants, from federal to foundation. Please bring your questions and be prepared to share your experiences or strategies related to applying for or managing grants, the organizational structures or processes that support grants management, and other related topics.

You will also hear about two current opportunities: Program Specialists from OVW Legal Assistance for Victims (LAV) Program will provide an overview of the LAV program with a focus on the special funding initiative, the Expanding Legal Services Initiative. LAV program staff will review its purpose, eligibility, priority areas, and some general information about the application process. A Q&A session will follow. API-GBV staff will also provide information about our new ARP Support for Survivors grant program, which will support community-based, culturally-specific organizations serving survivors of violence.

 

ASL interpretation and live captioning provided.


Other details:

Meetings will be hosted on Zoom, and you are encouraged to join with video and voice to the extent that you are comfortable. These calls will not be recorded, but we may share takeaways, without identifying information, with our staff or community. ASL interpretation and captioning will be provided. Please get in contact with us, or indicate in your RSVP, if you require additional interpretation or accessibility features.

If you cannot make October’s call, but would like to be on the list for future dates, please email sluo@api-gbv.org.

Click here to RSVP!

Public Charge Final Rule: How will it impact immigrant survivors?

Public Charge Final Rule: How will it impact immigrant survivors?

10/12/22 at 12:00 – 1:00pm PST

On September 8, 2022, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) published its final Public Charge rule, to go into effect on December 23, 2022. The rule strengthens public charge policies that had been in effect since March 2021, which describes which persons may be determined a “public charge” and thereby denied admission or lawful permanent residency to the U.S.

In this webinar, API-GBV’s Director of Policy, Grace Huang, walked participants through the provisions under the public charge final rule; the circumstances under which survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, or trafficking may be exempt; and the supports and options available to immigrants survivors and their families.

Related Resources

Hosted by API-GBV featuring Grace Huang, Directory of Policy at API-GBV

October 2022

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AAPI Creatives’ Chat – Masculinity, Fear, and Self Worth with Amanda Chen

AAPI Creatives’ Chat – Masculinity, Fear, and Self Worth with Amanda Chen

9/27/22 at 12:00 – 1:00pm PST

API-GBV is excited to welcome Amanda Chen to the first of our ‘AAPI Creatives’ Conversations. Amanda Chen is a serial entrepreneur, motivational speaker that has always been passionate about discussing concepts of gender, identity and self worth. She hosted the 100 Masked Men podcast series, during which she interviewed 100 anonymous men about sex and relationships, masculinity and everything in between. Join us to learn about some of Amanda’s biggest Aha! moments from these 100 conversations, what it means to be an advocate for social justice through a non-traditional medium, and what her most recent endeavors into self-reflection can teach us about combating burnout in this work.

You can learn more about Amanda at missamandachen.com.

Related Resources

Hosted by API-GBV and featuring Amanda Chen

September 2022

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API-GBV welcomes protections for immigrant survivors under the final public charge rule

September 8, 2022

This morning, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) published its final Public Charge rule. The final rule will be published in the Federal Register for public inspection tomorrow, September 9th  and will go into effect December 23rd. Although the rule does not reflect all of the recommendations that we urged to support survivors during the rulemaking process, we commend DHS for moving forward with provisions that make life-saving support accessible to immigrant survivors of violence. API-GBV will continue to work with our partner organizations, DHS, and the administration to strengthen these supports and contribute to an immigration system that protects, rather than discriminates against, immigrants who are experiencing gender-based violence.

The rule primarily adopts the 1999 Interim Field Guidance. Some of these are briefly described below: 

  • Accessing cash assistance for income maintenance and institutionalization (including state funded benefits) will be considered in looking at the totality of circumstances in a public charge determination. This means receipt of cash benefit programs like TANF, SSI, and state General Assistance programs that look at income to determine eligibility will be considered as part of the test. Other cash programs, like short-term emergency benefits, or earned benefits like unemployment compensation or non-governmental grants are not included. Immigrant survivors should be encouraged to access health, food, housing benefits and other supports they need to overcome the harm they’ve experienced.
  • The rule lists out the categories of individuals that are exempt from the public charge rule including VAWA Self Petitioners, and U- and T- visa holders (in current status), as well as refugees, asylees, and those with Temporary Protected Status, Special Immigrant Juvenile status, among others.
  • The recipient of benefits is clarified to only apply to the person seeking status, and not their children or other household members who are not seeking to be admitted. Recipients of benefits do not include those who applied but did not receive benefits, such as parents who apply for their US Citizen children.
  • The rule spells out the statutory factors to be considered (i.e. age, family status, income, health, education, availability of a valid Affidavit of Support) in examining the totality of circumstances to be considered if one is likely to become a public charge.

API-GBV and our partners will continue to work with DHS to support survivor-supportive language as they develop policy guidance for immigration officers and new forms to implement the rule.

API-GBV will be holding a webinar to clarify some of the rule’s provisions in the next few months. You can also find general updates and information from the Protecting Immigrant Families campaign.

ARP Support for Survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault from Culturally Specific Populations Grant Program

ARP Support for Survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault from Culturally Specific Populations Grant Program

On March 11, 2021, President Biden signed into law the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARP), a $1.9 trillion economic stimulus bill designed to speed up America’s recovery from the economic and health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. With the passage of this bill, the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) program received a historic increase in supplemental funding for domestic violence shelters, supportive services, tribes, sexual assault programs, and culturally specific programs.

In support of sexual assault (SA) and domestic violence (DV) survivors, this funding provides a total of $49.5 million for the FVPSA program to support culturally specific services. The Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (API-GBV) along with our colleagues — Esperanza United, the National Center on Violence Against Women in the Black Community/UJIMA, Inc., the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, Inc. (NIWRC), and the Alaska Native Women’s Resource Center (AKNWRC) — will utilize our expertise, networks, and resources  to provide technical assistance and support to local, community-based culturally specific programs that serve survivors from our respective cultural communities.

About the ARP Support for Survivors Program

As a result, API-GBV was awarded $13.2 million through FVPSA to distribute and manage this funding to community-based, culturally specific organizations that serve SA and DV survivors in Asian and Pacific Islander communities in the U.S. Working in partnership with SA training and technical assistance provider, the National Organization of Asians and Pacific Islanders Ending Sexual Violence (NAPIESV), our collective goal is to support community-based organizations in providing culturally responsive services and resources to: 

  • Address emergent needs resulting from the COVID-19 public health emergency, and 
  • Promote strategic partnership development and collaboration in responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency on survivors of SA and DV.

Program Details

API-GBV will distribute subgrants to assist community-based organizations providing culturally specific services to adults, children, and youth impacted by SA and DV from Asian/Asian American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander (AANHPI), and Middle Eastern (ME) communities in the United States and affiliated territories.

Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Capacity Building Fund

Up to $300,000 per subaward to community-based, culturally specific programs serving domestic violence and sexual assault survivors. Click on the following links for more information and to apply for the DV/SA Capacity Building Fund:

Request for Proposal

Online Application

FAQ Sheet

Grant Application How-To Guide

Grant Application How-To Video

Informational Webinar Recording

Informational Webinar Slides

Grant Writing 101 Webinar Recording

About the DV/SA Capacity Building Fund

  • Up to $300,000 over a two-year project period (March 2023 – February 2025) per subaward
  • Up to 40 subawards will be distributed to DV/SA programs or “ARP Partners”
  • Purpose: support the provision of services developed by culturally specific, community-based DV/SA programs implementing culturally relevant and linguistically appropriate services and supports for individuals and families from Asian and Pacific Islander communities in the U.S. and territories.

Scope of Proposed Projects

API-GBV will select community-based, culturally specific programs that are responsive to the needs of Asian/Asian American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, and Middle Eastern survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault and their dependents. API-GBV encourages community-based, innovative approaches and strategies to address domestic violence and sexual assault in these culturally specific communities that would ultimately lead to short-term, transitional, and/or long-term safety and recovery for adults, children and youth.

Key Dates

  • Announcement of DV/SA Capacity Building Fund RFP, Online Application Opens: November 4, 2022
  • Informational Webinars
  • Grant Writing 101 Webinar
  • Application due: December 23, 2022 at 11:59pm PST
  • Review of Applications: January 16, 2023 – January 27, 2023
  • Announcement of DV/SA Subrecipients: Week of February 13, 2023
  • DV/SA Capacity Building Fund Project Period: March 1, 2023 – February 28, 2025

More details about each funding opportunity and application process will be announced in the upcoming weeks across API-GBV’s network.

Technical Assistance

API-GBV staff are available to provide technical assistance on the application process. As national culturally specific resource centers on domestic violence and sexual assault, API-GBV and NAPIESV staff will provide technical assistance throughout the project period. Subrecipients under the ARP Support for Survivors Program  will be provided: 

  • One-on-one, specialized technical assistance; 
  • Access to online training and educational resources;
  • A virtual learning community with peers in the program;
  • Opportunities to convene in person (if public health regulations permit) to share knowledge and resources, strengthen partnerships, strategically plan for the future, and honor the leadership and brilliance of our cultural communities;
  • Guidance on reporting, evaluation, special topics; and more.

Contact Information

Submit questions and requests for assistance with the application process to ARPsupport@api-gbv.org. Visit www.api-gbv.org/arpsupport for more information about the ARP Support for Survivors Program. Sign up for email updates about the program at www.api-gbv.org/listserv.

    Past Events

    ARP Support for Survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault from Culturally Specific Populations Grant Program

    ARP Support for Survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault from Culturally Specific Populations Grant Program

    On March 11, 2021, President Biden signed into law the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARP), a $1.9 trillion economic stimulus bill designed to speed up America’s recovery from the economic and health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. With the passage of this bill, the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) program received a historic increase in supplemental funding for domestic violence shelters, supportive services, tribes, sexual assault programs, and culturally specific programs.

    In support of sexual assault (SA) and domestic violence (DV) survivors, this funding provides a total of $49.5 million for the FVPSA program to support culturally specific services. The Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (API-GBV) along with our colleagues — Esperanza United, the National Center on Violence Against Women in the Black Community/UJIMA, Inc., the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, Inc. (NIWRC), and the Alaska Native Women’s Resource Center (AKNWRC) — will utilize our expertise, networks, and resources  to provide technical assistance and support to local, community-based culturally specific programs that serve survivors from our respective cultural communities.

    About the ARP Support for Survivors Program

    As a result, API-GBV was awarded $13.2 million through FVPSA to distribute and manage this funding to community-based, culturally specific organizations that serve SA and DV survivors in Asian and Pacific Islander communities in the U.S. Working in partnership with SA training and technical assistance provider, the National Organization of Asians and Pacific Islanders Ending Sexual Violence (NAPIESV), our collective goal is to support community-based organizations in providing culturally responsive services and resources to: 

    • Address emergent needs resulting from the COVID-19 public health emergency, and 
    • Promote strategic partnership development and collaboration in responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency on survivors of SA and DV.

    Program Details

    API-GBV will distribute subgrants to assist community-based organizations providing culturally specific services to adults, children, and youth impacted by SA and DV from Asian/Asian American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander (AANHPI), and Middle Eastern (ME) communities in the United States and affiliated territories.

    Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Capacity Building Fund

    Up to $300,000 per subaward to community-based, culturally specific programs serving domestic violence and sexual assault survivors. Click on the following links for more information and to apply for the DV/SA Capacity Building Fund:

    Request for Proposal

    Online Application

    FAQ Sheet

    Grant Application How-To Guide

    Grant Application How-To Video

    Informational Webinar Recording

    Informational Webinar Slides

    Grant Writing 101 Webinar Recording

    About the DV/SA Capacity Building Fund

    • Up to $300,000 over a two-year project period (March 2023 – February 2025) per subaward
    • Up to 40 subawards will be distributed to DV/SA programs or “ARP Partners”
    • Purpose: support the provision of services developed by culturally specific, community-based DV/SA programs implementing culturally relevant and linguistically appropriate services and supports for individuals and families from Asian and Pacific Islander communities in the U.S. and territories.

    Scope of Proposed Projects

    API-GBV will select community-based, culturally specific programs that are responsive to the needs of Asian/Asian American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, and Middle Eastern survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault and their dependents. API-GBV encourages community-based, innovative approaches and strategies to address domestic violence and sexual assault in these culturally specific communities that would ultimately lead to short-term, transitional, and/or long-term safety and recovery for adults, children and youth.

    Key Dates

    • Announcement of DV/SA Capacity Building Fund RFP, Online Application Opens: November 4, 2022
    • Informational Webinars
    • Grant Writing 101 Webinar
    • Application due: December 23, 2022 at 11:59pm PST
    • Review of Applications: January 16, 2023 – January 27, 2023
    • Announcement of DV/SA Subrecipients: Week of February 13, 2023
    • DV/SA Capacity Building Fund Project Period: March 1, 2023 – February 28, 2025

    More details about each funding opportunity and application process will be announced in the upcoming weeks across API-GBV’s network.

    Technical Assistance

    API-GBV staff are available to provide technical assistance on the application process. As national culturally specific resource centers on domestic violence and sexual assault, API-GBV and NAPIESV staff will provide technical assistance throughout the project period. Subrecipients under the ARP Support for Survivors Program  will be provided: 

    • One-on-one, specialized technical assistance; 
    • Access to online training and educational resources;
    • A virtual learning community with peers in the program;
    • Opportunities to convene in person (if public health regulations permit) to share knowledge and resources, strengthen partnerships, strategically plan for the future, and honor the leadership and brilliance of our cultural communities;
    • Guidance on reporting, evaluation, special topics; and more.

    Contact Information

    Submit questions and requests for assistance with the application process to ARPsupport@api-gbv.org. Visit www.api-gbv.org/arpsupport for more information about the ARP Support for Survivors Program. Sign up for email updates about the program at www.api-gbv.org/listserv.

      Centering AANHPI Survivors: Recommendations for Campus and Title IX Administrators

      Centering AANHPI Survivors: Recommendations for Campus and Title IX Administrators

      This summary report lifts up the experiences and needs of Asian, Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander students and staff who face dating and domestic violence, sexual assault, or sexual harassment on campus. While focused on experiences of survivors on college campuses, the findings and recommendations may also have implications for AANHPI students in the context of K-12 schools. Many thanks to the AANHPI survivors and advocates who were willing to share their experiences and insights with API-GBV!

      Related Resources

      Mia Bladin and Grace Huang, J.D.

      August 2022

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      Faith-Based Partnerships: Engaging Spiritual Leaders in Responding to AAPI Survivors

      Faith-Based Partnerships: Engaging Spiritual Leaders in Responding to AAPI Survivors

      9/20/22 at 12:00 – 1:30 pm PST

      From spiritual abuse to being a key tenant of survivors’ healing journey, faith plays a critical role in many survivors’ experiences with violence. Faith leaders such as pastors or temple leaders are frequently the first ones that survivors disclose their experience to. Yet our work with several AAPI faith communities has shown that faith leaders are rarely equipped to respond to DV/SA within the congregation. Therefore it’s essential that we engage faith leaders to be allies in the response to violence.

      This webinar gathered four of API-GBV’s partners from a multi-year faith-based advocacy project that reached several Chinese/Taiwanese Christian churches and seminaries, Sikh gurdwaras, and Korean Christian congregations in California. The panel shared what their experience has been to navigate potential resistance from faith leaders in their communities, build a mutual relationship with them, co-develop trainings and curriculums, and provide support in their responses to violence. Participants left with strategies and considerations for working with faith communities against violence.

      Related Resources

      Hosted by API-GBV and featuring four of API-GBV’s partners from a multi-year faith-based advocacy project

      September 2022

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      Policy Advocacy for AAPI Survivor Serving Organizations

      Policy Advocacy for AAPI Survivor Serving Organizations

      9/14/22 at 12:00 – 1:30 pm PST

      When AAPI advocates say they want to work on policy advocacy, what does that mean? Do rules governing non-profits limit our ability to advocate to improve systems and laws impacting AAPI survivors?

      Because elected officials vote on bills, make public statements, issue administrative rules and other executive decisions, and continue to impact how systems impact our communities, policy advocacy is a critical component of the work of AAPI survivor-serving organizations. This webinar will cover strategies for engaging in policy advocacy and policy analysis as advocates in AAPI communities. We will also provide a brief overview of the federal rules impacting 501(c)(3) organizations as we work to educate our communities about policy issues and actions taken by elected officials, both in legislative bodies, and in the executive branch.

      Related Resources

      Hosted by API-GBV and featuring API-GBV’s Director of Policy Grace Huang

      September 2022

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      Navigating HUD With AANHPI Survivors

      Navigating HUD With AANHPI Survivors

      API-GBV was joined by Karlo Ng, Director on Gender-based Violence Prevention and Equity, Office of the Secretary at the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. Ms. Ng shared tips and resources in navigating HUD housing and homelessness programs to best support AANHPI survivors and AANHPI culturally specific organizations.

      Related Resources

      Hosted by API-GBV and featuring Karlo Ng

      July 2022

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      Defending Criminalized Survivors Workshop

      Defending Criminalized Survivors Workshop

      8/10/22 at 12:00 – 1:30 pm PST

      What happens when the laws that are supposed to protect survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault become turned against them? Survivors can be criminalized for reacting in self-defense, participating in criminal activity under their abusers’ coercion, or for failing to protect their children from witnessing or being impacted by violence in the home. Survivors of color, who struggle with mental health or substance dependency, or who otherwise don’t fold the “perfect victim” mold are disproportionately incarcerated. In this workshop, API-GBV was joined by Hyejin Shim and Neda Said of Survived & Punished, who guided participants through a discussion of the criminalization of survivors, and how advocates can support criminalized survivors.

      Related Resources

      Hosted by API-GBV and featuring Neda Said and Hyejin Shim of Survived and Punished

      August 2022

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