This project aimed to translate and develop educational resources and tools on GBV in indigenous Pasifika languages. The project aims to empower individuals, families, community-based and system responders, allied professionals, and the community-at-large with culturally responsive resources to address and prevent GBV in Pasifika communities. Resources include project report and glossaries and tools for Samoan, Chuukese, and Native Hawaiian communities.

Related Resources

Defining an Effective Response to DVSA in American Samoa

Defining an Effective Response to DVSA in American Samoa

By American Samoa Alliance Against Domestic & Sexual Violence
A quantitative and qualitative comparison of the service provision and overall response to domestic violence and sexual assault in American Samoa. This project examines the gaps between what services are available and what victims report needing; it aims to answer, “What does an effective response to domestic violence and sexual assault look like in American Samoa?”

Behind closed doors: How domestic violence among Pacific Islanders remains in the shadows, 2018

Behind closed doors: How domestic violence among Pacific Islanders remains in the shadows, 2018

Published by Peninsula Press
“In the wake of noteworthy sexual assault allegations in the government and Hollywood, the nation is being forced to reckon with the pervasiveness of gender-based violence. But for Pacific Islanders, a population that is small in the U.S. even for a minority group, the prevalence of assault and abuse is easily overlooked by agencies that serve entire cities or counties.”

Pasifika Power & Control Wheel Translation Project Report
Matāpuna Ma’ilo Levenson, MSW
API-GBV

This report highlights the indigenous methodologies used and lessons learned from this project, and provides recommendations for how communities can integrate the approaches and lessons learned to their own work of ending gender-based violence in their respective communities.

Native Hawaiian Resources: The Mo’ohihia framework

Developed by project consultants Kekai Lindsey and Ho’oleina Ioane, the Mo’ohihia framework reflects the succession of difficulties that progress through generations (Mo’ohihia).

Samoan Resources: The ‘Ato and Afa Frameworks

Project partners Suzanna Tiapula and Dr. Michael Ligaliga developed two frameworks for understanding and responding to domestic and gender-based violence from a Samoan cultural perspective: O le ʻAto lau niu (the coconut leaf basket) and O le filigā Afa (the sennit rope braiding process).

Chuukese Resources: Tatan Imw Framework

Project consultants Innocenta Sound-Kikku and Paul Otoko created the Tatan Imw framework: Broken Roles, Responsibilities and Values within Chuukese Homes. This framework focus on three important roles that comprise Chuukese life and Re Chuuk (Chuukese people) worldview : Wa (individuals), Imw (home and family), and Uut (clan and community).

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