This tipsheet 1-pager, developed by Korean American Family Services (KFAM) describes some suggested practices for working with faith leaders on DV/SV response and prevention.

Related Resources

What is Gendered Islamophobia? 2021

Building upon a history of shared values and intersecting work, the Partnership to End Gendered Islamophobia brings together HEART, Justice for Muslims Collective and Vigilant Love to build analysis, tools and power to dismantle Gendered Islamophobia. This workshop is specifically tailored towards practitioners in the field of gender-based violence and gender justice. We focus on ways practitioners can better understand how gendered Islamophobia shows up in their work, and ways to respond in holistic ways. The workshop includes a focus on the intersection of gendered Islamophobia, gender-based violence and reproductive justice. The workshop emphasizes the invisibility of state violence in understanding gender-based violence and particularly the implications of the War on Terror and Islamophobia for Muslim survivors of gender-based violence. Moreover, this workshop includes discussions upon intra-community solidarity and what can be done within broader Asian American spaces to address gendered Islamophobia.

How COVID-19 and Systemic Responses Are Impacting Asian and Pacific Islander Survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault

This advisory explains how the COVID-19 outbreak is impacting Asian and Pacific Islander (API) survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, and describes policies enacted to address the pandemic including the CARES Act, and API and immigrant survivors’ eligibility for the programs and services offered in the legislation, as well as the implications of utilizing the services. The Advisory also discusses the effect of systematic responses to the COVID-19 crisis and the unique issues that API survivors face that systems must account for to support survivor safety during the pandemic.

Faithful Allies: Working with Christian Leaders

Almost 70-80% of Korean immigrants in the U.S. reports that they attend church regularly. Korean American Family Services (KFAM) has encountered so many survivors whose faith play a very important role for their journey to healing. Because of this reason, KFAM has been working with the Korean faith community for about 8 years in order to make our community more welcoming to survivors and to train faith leaders to become supportive first responders. Through this webinar, KFAM will share our work with faith leaders, our strategy and the impact of our work.

Trauma-Informed Care for AAPI Survivors: 3-Part Webinar Series

Presented in collaboration with four AAPI community organizations and shelters, this webinar series explores the impacts of trauma on AAPI survivors and communities. Presenters share insight about working with survivors in shelter and through immigration and legal cases; and discuss best practices for providing culturally-specific, trauma-informed services, particularly within the context of COVID-19.

From the Roots of Trauma to the Flowering of Trauma-Informed Care, 2020

In collaboration with Texas Muslim Women’s Foundation
This report charts TMWF’s process of becoming a trauma-informed agency which included learning about types of trauma and trauma-informed care, assessing existing culturally-sensitive practices that enhanced trauma-informed care and identifying ones that need to be added, training staff, and working with researchers to document and build a body of evidence-based practice — all the while staying survivor-centered.

Survivors with Limited English Proficiency: Barriers to Access

Limited English proficiency not only affects survivors’ ability to get help, but also employment, housing, benefits, health and mental health care, and to advocate for social and educational services for their children – factors compounding the vulnerability of, and the discrimination survivors face; more so for those contemplating leaving.

Asian and Pacific Islander Survivors: Barriers to Access

By dint of their immigrant, refugee, and/or other historically marginalized identities, API survivors face barriers that are compounded by socio-cultural factors such as economics, immigration status, culture, religion, systems failure, homophobia, victim-blaming communities, and limited English proficiency. In the changing landscape of gender violence, unique dynamics, new trends, stringent barriers, and increased manipulation by batterers, API survivors face complex service barriers. 

By Korean American Family Services (KFAM)

September 2020

For more on working with Korean Christian faith leaders, see our accompanying webinar.

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