The A-Z Advocacy Model is defined by the nexus of an extraordinary inventory of evidence-informed practices in response to existing and new trends in gender-based violence and inter-and intra-API cultural and linguistic diversity. It is anchored in principles that analyze gendered and racialized cultural contexts, confront root causes, engage in systems change and cultural transformation; all the while, holding women’s equality and empowerment central to community well-being. The A-Z Inventory of Practice and qualitative and quantitative data show how culturally-specific advocacy is operationalized.

Related Resources

Survivor-Centered Advocacy in Culturally Specific Communities: A Community-Based Participatory Research Project, 2019

The Survivor-Centered Advocacy Project was a California-based research justice project that utilized a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach. This report illustrates the basic principles of CBPR and makes recommendations for those wishing to do a CBPR project that holds historically marginalized communities at the center; and/or those attempting to align or deepen their practices according to what works for survivors from historically marginalized communities.

Strengthening Our Roots: Listening & Learning from Survivors & Supporters, 2017

By Sikh Family Center
This report, prepared by Sikh Family Center, compiles the qualitative data from 2 focus groups and 3 individual storytelling interviews facilitated by SFC in the Bay Area, California between November 2016 and January 2017. These groups and interviews consisted of survivors of gender-based violence, specifically family violence, as well as community members who regularly work (formally or informally) with survivors of violence.

Power through Partnerships: A CBPR Toolkit for Domestic Violence Researchers

This toolkit is for researchers across disciplines and social locations who are working in academic, policy, community, or practice-based settings. In particular, the toolkit provides support to emerging researchers as they consider whether and how to take a CBPR approach and what it might mean in the context of their professional roles and settings. Domestic violence advocates will also find useful information on the CBPR approach and how it can help answer important questions about your work.