On December 31, 2021, the White House issued a proclamation declaring January 2022 as National Human Trafficking Prevention Month. The proclamation highlights the importance of the federal government approach in the fight against human trafficking, and refers to the recently released National Plan to Combat Human Trafficking. The proclamation acknowledges how human trafficking disproportionately impacts communities that have been historically underserved and excluded, including 2SLGBTQIA+ individuals, communities of color, women and girls, and individuals migrating to the United States. The Administration also states that anti-trafficking efforts must always be connected to our broader efforts to advance equity and justice across our society. Here is the link to the proclamation.

 Read full proclamation

Related Resources:

Trafficking: Trauma & Trauma-Informed Collaboration & Advocacy, 2018

Building from what trafficking survivors have taught us, this webinar discusses how to identify survivors, how past experience of help-seeking can influence current attempts, and the importance of trauma-informed care at different points of contact with survivors such as raids, arrest, and at shelters.

Considerations and Recommendations on Trauma-Informed Advocacy for Trafficking Survivors, 2017

This TA Brief addresses the complexity of advocacy for adult and minor survivors of trafficking. Topics include: Definitions, Analysis/Root Causes, Trauma-Informed Advocacy, Endangerment & Confidentiality, and Considerations & Recommendations at Points of Contact — raids, arrest, custody and release, legal processes, shelters, and health and mental health systems.

Webinars on Survivor-Centered, Trauma-Informed Advocacy for Trafficking Survivors

a. Advocacy & Services for Trafficking Survivors, 2014: A comprehensive overview of sex and labor trafficking – actions/means/purposes, data, root causes, traumas and oppressions, help-seeking, legal remedies, cross-systems trauma-informed collaboration.

b. Supporting Domestic Trafficking Survivors, 2015: Two national experts, Tina Frundt and Elisabeth Corey, lay the foundations for understanding domestic minor sex trafficking, followed by the traumatic impacts of victimization and operationalizing trauma-informed responses within new and existing advocacy structures and partnerships.

c. The Culture of Family-Controlled Trafficking, 2016: Elisabeth Corey reaches into her story to teach us about the traffickers, the enablers, and the family on the outside and inside that operate family-controlled trafficking; and how survivors can be helped.