Asian and Pacific Islander activists in the anti-domestic violence movement are extraordinary, constantly building programs and organizing communities to address gender-based violence. There is a large group of powerful women leaders, who may not even define themselves as such, doing amazing work. Volunteers – male, female, youth, elderly – provide countless hours in programs, sometimes staffing entire organizations for years, and almost always in addition to busy lives as workers, home-makers, students, and parents. Advocates often encounter the hostility of their own communities, the inhospitable climate of multiple and baffling systems, and the urgency of so many victims in crisis. They may themselves be survivors of gender-based violence. Nevertheless, they have created a dynamic set of resources for women and other victims in their communities.

The Directory lists over 160 agencies in the U.S. that have culturally-specific programs designed for survivors from Asian and Pacific Islander communities. Also available is the online database, which can be used to search for agencies by location, ethnicities served, and language services.

Related Resources

From the Roots of Trauma to the Flowering of Trauma-Informed Care, 2020

In collaboration with Texas Muslim Women’s Foundation
This report charts TMWF’s process of becoming a trauma-informed agency which included learning about types of trauma and trauma-informed care, assessing existing culturally-sensitive practices that enhanced trauma-informed care and identifying ones that need to be added, training staff, and working with researchers to document and build a body of evidence-based practice — all the while staying survivor-centered.

Advisory Revised Aug 2019: How Will ‘Public Charge’ Proposed Policy Changes Impact Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault?

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released a final rule, published in the Federal Register on August 14, 2019, which significantly changes longstanding policy about the meaning and application of the “public charge” inadmissibility provisions of immigration law. According to DHS, this is to ensure that non-citizens “who are admitted to the United States, seek extension of stay or change of status, or apply for adjustment of status will be self-sufficient, i.e., will rely on their financial resources, as well as the financial resources of the family, sponsors, and private organizations.”

Survivors with Limited English Proficiency: Barriers to Access

Limited English proficiency not only affects survivors’ ability to get help, but also employment, housing, benefits, health and mental health care, and to advocate for social and educational services for their children – factors compounding the vulnerability of, and the discrimination survivors face; more so for those contemplating leaving.

API-GBV

Updated January 2020

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