Asian and Pacific Islander activists in the anti-domestic violence movement are extraordinary, constantly building programs and organizing communities to address gender-based violence. There is a large group of powerful women leaders, who may not even define themselves as such, doing amazing work. Volunteers – male, female, youth, elderly – provide countless hours in programs, sometimes staffing entire organizations for years, and almost always in addition to busy lives as workers, home-makers, students, and parents. Advocates often encounter the hostility of their own communities, the inhospitable climate of multiple and baffling systems, and the urgency of so many victims in crisis. They may themselves be survivors of gender-based violence. Nevertheless, they have created a dynamic set of resources for women and other victims in their communities.

The Directory lists 165 agencies in the U.S. that have culturally-specific programs designed for survivors from Asian and Pacific Islander communities. Also available is the online database, which can be used to search for agencies by location, ethnicities served, and language services.

Related Resources

Survivors with Limited English Proficiency: Barriers to Access

Limited English proficiency not only affects survivors’ ability to get help, but also employment, housing, benefits, health and mental health care, and to advocate for social and educational services for their children – factors compounding the vulnerability of, and the discrimination survivors face; more so for those contemplating leaving.

Asian and Pacific Islander Survivors: Barriers to Access

By dint of their immigrant, refugee, and/or other historically marginalized identities, API survivors face barriers that are compounded by socio-cultural factors such as economics, immigration status, culture, religion, systems failure, homophobia, victim-blaming communities, and limited English proficiency. In the changing landscape of gender violence, unique dynamics, new trends, stringent barriers, and increased manipulation by batterers, API survivors face complex service barriers. 

Building Our Communities: Organizational Sustainability

Originally presented in two parts, this workshop is designed to help increase the organizational capacity of agencies serving culturally specific and underserved communities. As we rarely get time to talk about our organizations, these slides consider how they can be healthier, what sustainability means and includes, and ways to adapt models in a way that aligns with our values, culture and what we want to accomplish.

Defining an Effective Response to DVSA in American Samoa

By American Samoa Alliance Against Domestic & Sexual Violence
A quantitative and qualitative comparison of the service provision and overall response to domestic violence and sexual assault in American Samoa. This project examines the gaps between what services are available and what victims report needing; it aims to answer, “What does an effective response to domestic violence and sexual assault look like in American Samoa?”

API-GBV

Updated Spring 2019

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