Battered Mothers Involved with Child Protective Services reports the voices, views and recommendations of battered immigrant, refugee and indigenous women, derived from their experiences in the domestic violence and child protective services systems. They begin with powerful poems that speak of sorrows and humiliations, but celebrate integrity and cultural identities.

Based on information gathered from 9 focus groups of 30 women in Hawai’i and Massachusetts, 74 national surveys from advocates, and 22 key informants from Child Protective Services (CPS), domestic violence programs, attorneys, and others; this report:

  • Informs the development of policies, practices and interventions to address the physical, emotional and spiritual health of individuals, families and communities;
  • Demonstrates how CPS and domestic violence services can be more responsive to the needs of battered mothers, their children and families; and
  • Explores how community (family, friends, neighbors, churches, civic organizations) can be more responsive to partner abuse and c

Related Resources

Advisory: How Will ‘Public Charge’ Proposed Policy Changes Impact Immigrant Survivors of Crime? 2018

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is planning to propose regulations that discard longstanding policy about the meaning and application of the “public charge” provisions of immigration law. Proposed policies will have a significant detrimental impact on survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault by deterring immigrant families, including those with U.S.-citizen children, from seeking help when they need it. Safety net benefits can help victims recover and escape from abuse and play a significant role in preventing future harm.

by V. Pualani Enos

A pilot project of API-GBV, National Network to End Violence Against Immigrant Women, & Institute on Race and Justice at Northeastern University

Revised 2010

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