Battered Mothers Involved with Child Protective Services reports the voices, views and recommendations of battered immigrant, refugee and indigenous women, derived from their experiences in the domestic violence and child protective services systems. They begin with powerful poems that speak of sorrows and humiliations, but celebrate integrity and cultural identities.

Based on information gathered from 9 focus groups of 30 women in Hawai’i and Massachusetts, 74 national surveys from advocates, and 22 key informants from Child Protective Services (CPS), domestic violence programs, attorneys, and others; this report:

  • Informs the development of policies, practices and interventions to address the physical, emotional and spiritual health of individuals, families and communities;
  • Demonstrates how CPS and domestic violence services can be more responsive to the needs of battered mothers, their children and families; and
  • Explores how community (family, friends, neighbors, churches, civic organizations) can be more responsive to partner abuse and c

Related Resources

Advisory Revised Aug 2019: How Will ‘Public Charge’ Proposed Policy Changes Impact Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault?

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released a final rule, published in the Federal Register on August 14, 2019, which significantly changes longstanding policy about the meaning and application of the “public charge” inadmissibility provisions of immigration law. According to DHS, this is to ensure that non-citizens “who are admitted to the United States, seek extension of stay or change of status, or apply for adjustment of status will be self-sufficient, i.e., will rely on their financial resources, as well as the financial resources of the family, sponsors, and private organizations.”

Advisory: How Do Recent HUD Proposed Rules About Verification of Immigration Status Impact Survivors of Domestic & Sexual Assault?

The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) proposed regulations that change longstanding policy relating to immigration status verification requirements and disallowing those ineligible for federal housing assistance (i.e., members of “mixed-status” households) from residing in HUD’s public and specified assisted housing programs. This advisory describes impacts of the proposed rule on immigrant survivors of violence

May 2019 Advocate & Legal Services Findings: Immigrant Survivors Fear Reporting Violence

In May 2019, a coalition of national organizations gathered feedback from nearly six hundred advocates and attorneys from across the United States, learning that many immigrant victims of domestic and sexual violence are now too afraid to call the police or go to court to get help. The advocates report that survivors have an increased fear of deportation, retaliation by their abusers, and separation from their children.

by V. Pualani Enos

A pilot project of API-GBV, National Network to End Violence Against Immigrant Women, & Institute on Race and Justice at Northeastern University

Revised 2010

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