Global displacements have reached a record high: an unprecedented 65.3 million people, of which 22.5 million are refugees, had been displaced from their homes by conflict and persecution by the end of 2015, according to UNCHR.  The trauma of displacement is compounded by levels of gender-based violence, especially sexual violence, women and girls face in conflict zones, during flight or in refugee camps, and during resettlement.  This fact sheet identifies the barriers refugee survivors of domestic violence face and approaches that can mitigate their impact.

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Advisory Revised Aug 2019: How Will ‘Public Charge’ Proposed Policy Changes Impact Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault?

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released a final rule, published in the Federal Register on August 14, 2019, which significantly changes longstanding policy about the meaning and application of the “public charge” inadmissibility provisions of immigration law. According to DHS, this is to ensure that non-citizens “who are admitted to the United States, seek extension of stay or change of status, or apply for adjustment of status will be self-sufficient, i.e., will rely on their financial resources, as well as the financial resources of the family, sponsors, and private organizations.”

Survivors with Limited English Proficiency: Barriers to Access

Limited English proficiency not only affects survivors’ ability to get help, but also employment, housing, benefits, health and mental health care, and to advocate for social and educational services for their children – factors compounding the vulnerability of, and the discrimination survivors face; more so for those contemplating leaving.

Asian and Pacific Islander Survivors: Barriers to Access

By dint of their immigrant, refugee, and/or other historically marginalized identities, API survivors face barriers that are compounded by socio-cultural factors such as economics, immigration status, culture, religion, systems failure, homophobia, victim-blaming communities, and limited English proficiency. In the changing landscape of gender violence, unique dynamics, new trends, stringent barriers, and increased manipulation by batterers, API survivors face complex service barriers. 

Building Our Communities: Organizational Sustainability

Originally presented in two parts, this workshop is designed to help increase the organizational capacity of agencies serving culturally specific and underserved communities. As we rarely get time to talk about our organizations, these slides consider how they can be healthier, what sustainability means and includes, and ways to adapt models in a way that aligns with our values, culture and what we want to accomplish.

Defining an Effective Response to DVSA in American Samoa

By American Samoa Alliance Against Domestic & Sexual Violence
A quantitative and qualitative comparison of the service provision and overall response to domestic violence and sexual assault in American Samoa. This project examines the gaps between what services are available and what victims report needing; it aims to answer, “What does an effective response to domestic violence and sexual assault look like in American Samoa?”

Behind closed doors: How domestic violence among Pacific Islanders remains in the shadows, 2018

Published by Peninsula Press
“In the wake of noteworthy sexual assault allegations in the government and Hollywood, the nation is being forced to reckon with the pervasiveness of gender-based violence. But for Pacific Islanders, a population that is small in the U.S. even for a minority group, the prevalence of assault and abuse is easily overlooked by agencies that serve entire cities or counties.”

API-GBV September 2016
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