This project, conceptualized by Mimi Kim, is an attempt to document the accomplishments and limitations of the API movement to resist violence against women. It goes beyond narrow notions of cultural competence and language accessibility to examine the underlying assumptions and principles which guide intervention strategies and those that define these strategies as innovations rather than simple cultural accommodations. This report draws from interviews with 10 API women working in the anti-domestic violence movement who were asked to discuss this topic.

Related Resources

Behind closed doors: How domestic violence among Pacific Islanders remains in the shadows, 2018

Published by Peninsula Press
“In the wake of noteworthy sexual assault allegations in the government and Hollywood, the nation is being forced to reckon with the pervasiveness of gender-based violence. But for Pacific Islanders, a population that is small in the U.S. even for a minority group, the prevalence of assault and abuse is easily overlooked by agencies that serve entire cities or counties.”

Advisory Revised Oct 2018: How Will ‘Public Charge’ Proposed Policy Changes Impact Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault?

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is planning to propose regulations that discard longstanding policy about the meaning and application of the “public charge” provisions of immigration law. Proposed policies will have a significant detrimental impact on survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault by deterring immigrant families, including those with U.S.-citizen children, from seeking help when they need it. Safety net benefits can help victims recover and escape from abuse and play a significant role in preventing future harm.

by Mimi Kim
API-GBV

Revised February 2010

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