Recent policy proposals call for increased entanglement between immigration enforcement and state and local police, which undermines existing protections for domestic violence and sexual assault survivors. This will reduce the likelihood of immigrant victims or witnesses reporting crimes and create unprecedented fear for immigrant families and communities. The reports presented in this document illustrate these problems.

Related Resources

PowerfuL Partnerships: Collaborative efforts to address human trafficking affecting AAPI communities, 2022

PowerfuL Partnerships: Collaborative efforts to address human trafficking affecting AAPI communities, 2022

Alia El-Sawi, a Victim Assistance Specialist at the Department of Homeland Security, joins API-GBV for our first “fireside chat” hosted by our Executive Director Monica Khant. Drawing also from her previous role as the Anti-Human Trafficking Coordinator at a community-based organization that provides culturally-responsive services for survivors of human trafficking, Alia will discuss what can be done to increase coordination and communication between DHS agents and community-based advocates in responding to trafficking situations and minimizing trauma for survivors. The conversation will also illuminate challenges to current anti-trafficking efforts, including fear of reporting, human-trafficking’s concurrence with other forms of gender-based violence, and the abundant stereotypes around the trafficking of AAPI individuals.

Advisory Revised Feb 2022: How Will ‘Public Charge’ Proposed Policy Changes Impact Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault?

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is proposing a new rule that put longstanding policy about the meaning and application of the “public charge” provisions of immigration law into regulation form. This advisory describes provisions under this new proposed rule and how it will impact immigrant survivors of violence, particularly in light of the pandemic.

The Impact of New Proposed Public Charge Rules on Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Human Trafficking, 2022

The Impact of New Proposed Public Charge Rules on Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Human Trafficking, 2022

The Department of Homeland Security has posted a draft public charge proposed rule to update regulations that guide officials in determining when people seeking entry to or permanent status in the US can be denied, because they are determined to be likely to become a “public charge.” Come join us for a webinar to get an overview of the proposal, to learn about how the proposal impacts immigrant survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking, and how the experiences of survivors can impact the final rule.

Advisory: How Do Recent HUD Proposed Rules About Verification of Immigration Status Impact Survivors of Domestic & Sexual Assault?

The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) proposed regulations that change longstanding policy relating to immigration status verification requirements and disallowing those ineligible for federal housing assistance (i.e., members of “mixed-status” households) from residing in HUD’s public and specified assisted housing programs. This advisory describes impacts of the proposed rule on immigrant survivors of violence

November 2017

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